Five Important Things to Do

Marketing Scripts_peBeing in the staffing industry for 40+ years, I’ve seen a lot of recruiters just give up in a tough economy. Even though a lot of companies are cutting back on hiring, there are many recruiters who are still thriving. Here are just five things they are doing:

Start thinking Contract and Contract-to-Hire. If you’ve only done Direct Hire in the past, go back to your previous clients where you have had successful placements and offer them Contract and Contract-to-Hire candidates. A lot of candidates are willing now, more than ever, to take a short term assignment when they need to make some money sooner than later. If you’re an independent recruiter, this might not make sense, since you would have to fund payroll, but if you work for a staffing firm, they should be able to handle it. And currently there are several really good funding companies out there that independent recruiters are utilizing. If you need one, you can contact me via the Meet Darryl page.

Find openings to fill by asking your candidates. When interviewing your candidates, ask them, only after you have developed some rapport and trust: Where have they interviewed? What position did they apply for? Who did they interview with? What salary figure were they talking? How did the company leave it with them? (Obviously if the candidate you are speaking with is still interested in this position, and being considered for it, it would not be ethical to call that company to try and get the job order).

Know how to handle objections with potential client companies. The staffing industry is like any other in the sense that it operates on supply and demand. When an ample supply of candidates exists like it does now, you need to be able to get your foot in the door and be better at it than the average recruiter. That means handling objections in a professional manner. Distinguish between a buy sign and an objection. A buy sign is any question asked about the candidate you might be marketing. (And I hope you’re marketing a good, qualified candidate).

One of the objections you might hear these days is: “We advertise on our own; there’s a flood of good people out there right now.” If you hear this, try saying this in response: “Some of our clients also advertise their openings. What they have found is that they become flooded with resumes of unqualified people. When you advertise on your own, you pay your money up front and take a chance. I do it all for you and you only pay me for results. You have nothing to lose by interviewing this outstanding candidate.”

Consider changing disciplines if your old path is drying up. Health care, government services and cyber security are just a few fields right now where hiring is still pretty hot. If you’ve been in construction or IT, for example, and it’s drying up, it might be worth your time to investigate what’s going on in other industries.

Develop a believable marketing presentation. Find a most place-able candidate. Develop a good presentation, and then deliver it consistently. Example: “I’m not calling to tell you about anyone or sell you anything; it’s just that while on a search for another company similar to yours, I found some outstanding candidates in ________ (software, hardware, electrical engineering, etc.). I simply wanted to let you know about that and see if, at this point, you have some interest in this kind of talent.”

Until next time, keep moving forward.

Darryl

EZRECRUITING.COM

 

 

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Humphrey Bogart

“The only point in making money is, you can tell some big shot where to go.” Humphrey Bogart

In essence, that’s what I did while on a marketing call when a potential client gave me a buy sign.

The buy sign came in the form of a question, as they usually do. I answered his question first and then said, “Tell me more about the position. Will this person report to you?” He replied, “You know what an AS400 programmer does … just find me one.”

“Bob, I’ll need to know a lot more than just finding an AS400 programmer if you expect me to provide you with an acceptable candidate for your company. If you can’t provide me with more details, I will not work on this opening for you. So what type of applications will this person work on?”

He said “You mean you won’t work on this position for me?” I said, “That’s correct. I am not going to waste my time or yours looking for a needle in a haystack, so if you want a qualified top notch candidate, then let’s get started. What applications will this person be working on?”

I was able to get the details and ultimately make this placement. When I did my two week follow up call to both the candidate and Bob to see how things were working out for them, Bob thanked me for not giving up on him at the beginning of our first conversation. “Darryl, when you finished asking your questions I think you knew more about the position and company than I did. That must be why your candidate turns out to be the best hire I’ve ever made.  He is fantastic!”

“That’s what I like to hear, Bob. *What else can I be working on for you?”

*Never miss a chance to ask for more orders. Make it a habit to ask!!!!

In the next post I’ll let you in on what I found out about treating the candidate no different than the client.

For more information, please visit my website. There’s a goldmine of tips & techniques in my latest e-book.

To your success,

Darryl

EZRecruiting

Growth is Painful

Marketing Scripts_peLet’s face it … we’ve all been stuck at times in our comfort zones. They’re different for everyone but one thing is consistent with all – life begins at the end of our comfort zone. I don’t know who to give credit to for that saying but it’s certainly true.

I still have days that I have to wake myself up from being in mine. But I know that if I don’t, everything remains static, stuck, and that’s not where my personal and professional growth is. Isn’t it true that forward momentum can be achieved simply by taking even baby steps each day?

Being good at handling objections is one of the ways we can strengthen our ability to move forward. Can it be painful? Yes! Why? Because most people have a fear of rejection. And what is a fear? In my opinion, it stands for False. Evidence. Appearing. Real.

Make the marketing calls. Get good at handling objections. Stop being fearful of rejection. Don’t take it personally. They can’t kill you!

Here’s an example:

“YOUR FEES ARE TOO HIGH”

“My service charge is not the lowest or the highest in our industry, however, the quality of my service and candidates is the highest. I can prove that by presenting you top talent that fits your needs at no cost to you. You can easily compare my service with the quality and service you’re getting now and then make the decision if my service charge is too high. Fair enough?”

I truly hope these tips are helping. For more information, please  visit my website and see if there’s something there that can get you closer to your goals.

Until next time, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting

 

 

Objection 3: We Advertise on Our Own

Another common objection you may hear when marketing for new job orders is “We advertise on our own.”

Experience has taught me that the easiest way to handle this is by saying …

“Some of our clients also advertise certain positions on the job boards, etc. The challenge they find with this is that they become flooded with resumes of unqualified people. When you advertise on your own, you spend your advertising money up front and take the chance that it will provide you with top talent. I do it all; and you pay me only for results. Most of the people we place are currently working and not sitting at home combing the internet postings. You have nothing to lose by interviewing this outstanding individual.

(Then close with a call to action) … “Please tell me just what it is you’re looking for.”

Marketing Scripts_peFor more information on this topic, take a look at my latest publication: Marketing Strategies & How to Handle Objections

Until next time, have a great day!

 

ezrecruiting.com

 

Objection 2

Continuing with our list of objections that you may hear when marketing is this rather common one:

“We have no openings.”

So how would you handle this one? Let me suggest what has worked for me.

First, isolate the objection by asking a question: Newest.12.11.15“Do you mean you have no openings for a __________________ (whatever you‘re marketing) or no openings at all?” (Listen).

  • “Most companies will make a place for a person who will increase their bottom line profit. Is that true in your company?”
  • “What would it take for you to create an opening in your organization?”
  • “How many people do you have in this position right now?”
  • “If you were to rate them on a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest based on not only work performance, but attitude, loyalty, and dependability, how many would be a 10?”
  • “How many are an 8 or 9?”
  • ‘Do you have any 5‘s or below? It‘s not uncommon for a company to have one or two weak links; people who aren’t pulling their load for whatever reasons. These people cost you money every day. The person I‘m representing is a 10. On his last job he (provide examples of what your candidate did to increase the bottom line). Your time would be well spent to interview this person and see if you don‘t agree that he would improve your company’s profitability.”
  • Other ways to handle this objection would be to ask questions like:
  • “When do you anticipate an opening?”
  • “How do you normally hire your people?”
  • “Have you considered upgrading your staff?”

Most people when new to sales have a tendency to start “selling” immediately when faced with an objection. Keep in mind how it feels to be “sold” by anyone you encounter in your life. It certainly turns me off to think that someone assumes what I want or need without first finding out what that might be. So why would you want to do that to someone else? Especially someone you want to gain as a new client. Earning a level of trust is paramount in our business. Asking good questions like those above could be just the platform you need to earn that trust from your prospect.

Next time we’ll cover Objection 3 – We advertise on our own.

Until then, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com

 

 

Objection 1

Our first objection from the last post was: “We had a bad experience with a staffing firm like yours.”

Here’s one way you could approach this objection (there are many others) and hopefully turn it into a future client.

01.05.16ObjectionAsk “Oh, what do you mean? (Listen). I understand how you feel. I‘ve had similar experiences with other types of companies. For example, I once had a negative experience with an insurance company. What I did to solve it was change insurance companies. I didn’t stop insuring my health, life, auto, property, etc. Can you see how the two relate? (Pause and listen). I would like to restore your faith in search firms. What critical staffing needs can I be working on for you? What are your biggest challenges in terms of finding top talent for your open positions?”

If your prospect still continues to voice an objection, you can always fall back to what I call the most important six words: “What would you like to happen?”

More tomorrow … in the meantime, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com

 

Objections You May Hear

Let’s face it. Selling can be a challenging situation sometimes. But all of us, from the time we were infants began selling something in one way or another. And, of course, we encountered objections. For example, let’s say your spouse wants to take you out to dinner. She says she doesn’t feel like it. She’d rather stay home and veg out after a tough day at her mind-numbing job. So what do you say? “Honey, wouldn’t it feel good to have some really great choices for dinner? To have someone wait on you, not have to do the dishes, and maybe pick your favorite dessert? We don’t have to get dressed up. We can pick a place that’s casual if that appeals to you.” 01.04.16Selling

What just happened here? You created mental pictures for her that, most likely, worked. She probably decided she’d like to go out to dinner after all.

So it is with objections that you may hear while marketing your most qualified candidates to companies.

These are some of the most common ones:

  • We had a bad experience with a company like yours
  • We have no openings
  • We advertise on our own
  • We don’t pay fees
  • Your fees are too high
  • We only deal with agencies who discount their fees
  • We use another search firm exclusively
  • We’re cutting our staff
  • We won’t have any openings for at least a month; I’ll call you

Tomorrow I’m going to begin the series of posts that teaches you how to handle/overcome these objections. Stay tuned!

Until then, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com