Five Important Things to Do

Marketing Scripts_peBeing in the staffing industry for 40+ years, I’ve seen a lot of recruiters just give up in a tough economy. Even though a lot of companies are cutting back on hiring, there are many recruiters who are still thriving. Here are just five things they are doing:

Start thinking Contract and Contract-to-Hire. If you’ve only done Direct Hire in the past, go back to your previous clients where you have had successful placements and offer them Contract and Contract-to-Hire candidates. A lot of candidates are willing now, more than ever, to take a short term assignment when they need to make some money sooner than later. If you’re an independent recruiter, this might not make sense, since you would have to fund payroll, but if you work for a staffing firm, they should be able to handle it. And currently there are several really good funding companies out there that independent recruiters are utilizing. If you need one, you can contact me via the Meet Darryl page.

Find openings to fill by asking your candidates. When interviewing your candidates, ask them, only after you have developed some rapport and trust: Where have they interviewed? What position did they apply for? Who did they interview with? What salary figure were they talking? How did the company leave it with them? (Obviously if the candidate you are speaking with is still interested in this position, and being considered for it, it would not be ethical to call that company to try and get the job order).

Know how to handle objections with potential client companies. The staffing industry is like any other in the sense that it operates on supply and demand. When an ample supply of candidates exists like it does now, you need to be able to get your foot in the door and be better at it than the average recruiter. That means handling objections in a professional manner. Distinguish between a buy sign and an objection. A buy sign is any question asked about the candidate you might be marketing. (And I hope you’re marketing a good, qualified candidate).

One of the objections you might hear these days is: “We advertise on our own; there’s a flood of good people out there right now.” If you hear this, try saying this in response: “Some of our clients also advertise their openings. What they have found is that they become flooded with resumes of unqualified people. When you advertise on your own, you pay your money up front and take a chance. I do it all for you and you only pay me for results. You have nothing to lose by interviewing this outstanding candidate.”

Consider changing disciplines if your old path is drying up. Health care, government services and cyber security are just a few fields right now where hiring is still pretty hot. If you’ve been in construction or IT, for example, and it’s drying up, it might be worth your time to investigate what’s going on in other industries.

Develop a believable marketing presentation. Find a most place-able candidate. Develop a good presentation, and then deliver it consistently. Example: “I’m not calling to tell you about anyone or sell you anything; it’s just that while on a search for another company similar to yours, I found some outstanding candidates in ________ (software, hardware, electrical engineering, etc.). I simply wanted to let you know about that and see if, at this point, you have some interest in this kind of talent.”

Until next time, keep moving forward.

Darryl

EZRECRUITING.COM

 

 

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They Asked Me

Over the years many people have asked me how I got started in recruiting and why I did. There are several reasons:

  1. I don’t believe in coincidence; everything happens for a reason. I happened to be in a place in my life where I knew something had to change for the better. I just didn’t know what. Then a friend told me about a guy who was looking to hire someone to help him in his business, which was a staffing agency. I applied for the job and, to my astonishment, he hired me. My first assignment was when he put a resume on my desk for an Applications Engineer. He handed me the phone book and said, “I don’t want to see you or hear from you until you’ve found a home for this guy.” After processing that for a minute, I put my head down and got to work. I knew I didn’t have time to get scared about what I didn’t “know.” Obviously the first few phone calls I made, talking with hiring authorities, they knew how green I was. One guy asked me, “How long have you been doing this?” I said, “About 20 minutes.” He laughed so hard, but also really appreciated my honesty and told me so. At that point, in what was to be a life-long career, I didn’t know what I didn’t know. (BTW – I did place that candidate in a new job – wow!) I was on my way and never looked back.
  2. As for the reasons I do this and have for so long, there are many, but the primary one is that it allows me to affect others’ lives in a significant way. When I place someone into a better situation than they’re currently in, whether it’s direct hire or a contract position, their circumstances inevitably improve. And on the client side, this new hire has made the hiring authority’s job easier. The new person will be an asset to that company’s productivity.
  3. Another reason is that I like building and maintaining good relationships. It’s a known fact that companies and people do business with people they know, like and trust. The trust factor is HUGE! It has to be there in order to have a continuing relationship. And how do you create that trust factor? By being real; by being who you are; by asking the right questions so that your prospective new client knows that you’re listening to their needs. One of the ways I like to do this is by asking, “What’s most important to you when you decide to hire someone? (Listen and write it down). Then ask, “What else is important to you?” (Listen and write that down). Then ask, “What else?” Ask, Ask, Ask! And when you’ve placed someone into a new job, you almost always have their trust and loyalty. It’s a win-win all the way around.

Marketing Scripts_peI truly hope these tips are helping. For more information, you can visit my website and see if there’s something there that can get you closer to your goals.

Until next time, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting

Objections You May Hear

Let’s face it. Selling can be a challenging situation sometimes. But all of us, from the time we were infants began selling something in one way or another. And, of course, we encountered objections. For example, let’s say your spouse wants to take you out to dinner. She says she doesn’t feel like it. She’d rather stay home and veg out after a tough day at her mind-numbing job. So what do you say? “Honey, wouldn’t it feel good to have some really great choices for dinner? To have someone wait on you, not have to do the dishes, and maybe pick your favorite dessert? We don’t have to get dressed up. We can pick a place that’s casual if that appeals to you.” 01.04.16Selling

What just happened here? You created mental pictures for her that, most likely, worked. She probably decided she’d like to go out to dinner after all.

So it is with objections that you may hear while marketing your most qualified candidates to companies.

These are some of the most common ones:

  • We had a bad experience with a company like yours
  • We have no openings
  • We advertise on our own
  • We don’t pay fees
  • Your fees are too high
  • We only deal with agencies who discount their fees
  • We use another search firm exclusively
  • We’re cutting our staff
  • We won’t have any openings for at least a month; I’ll call you

Tomorrow I’m going to begin the series of posts that teaches you how to handle/overcome these objections. Stay tuned!

Until then, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com

 

 

20 – 30 Seconds

Resume

It all starts with a resume. Sadly, there are still a lot of people who don’t know how to use theirs as a sales tool. They simply list their current and previous employers, along with a synopsis of their duties in those positions. Big mistake!

A good recruiter knows that hiring authorities take, on average, only 20-30 seconds to review a resume. Yeah, I know … that sucks but it’s the truth. And if they don’t see something right away that hits their hot button, they toss the candidate’s resume into the pile and the job seeker may never hear back from that company. Which leaves them wondering and, most likely, feeling less than confident about their skills.

It’s the recruiter’s job to talk to the job seeker and find out what could set them apart from the pack so that they stand a much better chance of getting hired. It’s also their job to sell something we in the industry call S.A.M. = Saved. Achieved. Made. In other words, what did the candidate Save, Achieve or Make for the companies they worked for? And on the other side they will talk with the hiring authority to find out exactly what they’re looking for in a qualified individual for their opening.

More to come … stay tuned … and have a blessed day,

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com