They Asked Me

Over the years many people have asked me how I got started in recruiting and why I did. There are several reasons:

  1. I don’t believe in coincidence; everything happens for a reason. I happened to be in a place in my life where I knew something had to change for the better. I just didn’t know what. Then a friend told me about a guy who was looking to hire someone to help him in his business, which was a staffing agency. I applied for the job and, to my astonishment, he hired me. My first assignment was when he put a resume on my desk for an Applications Engineer. He handed me the phone book and said, “I don’t want to see you or hear from you until you’ve found a home for this guy.” After processing that for a minute, I put my head down and got to work. I knew I didn’t have time to get scared about what I didn’t “know.” Obviously the first few phone calls I made, talking with hiring authorities, they knew how green I was. One guy asked me, “How long have you been doing this?” I said, “About 20 minutes.” He laughed so hard, but also really appreciated my honesty and told me so. At that point, in what was to be a life-long career, I didn’t know what I didn’t know. (BTW – I did place that candidate in a new job – wow!) I was on my way and never looked back.
  2. As for the reasons I do this and have for so long, there are many, but the primary one is that it allows me to affect others’ lives in a significant way. When I place someone into a better situation than they’re currently in, whether it’s direct hire or a contract position, their circumstances inevitably improve. And on the client side, this new hire has made the hiring authority’s job easier. The new person will be an asset to that company’s productivity.
  3. Another reason is that I like building and maintaining good relationships. It’s a known fact that companies and people do business with people they know, like and trust. The trust factor is HUGE! It has to be there in order to have a continuing relationship. And how do you create that trust factor? By being real; by being who you are; by asking the right questions so that your prospective new client knows that you’re listening to their needs. One of the ways I like to do this is by asking, “What’s most important to you when you decide to hire someone? (Listen and write it down). Then ask, “What else is important to you?” (Listen and write that down). Then ask, “What else?” Ask, Ask, Ask! And when you’ve placed someone into a new job, you almost always have their trust and loyalty. It’s a win-win all the way around.

Marketing Scripts_peI truly hope these tips are helping. For more information, you can visit my website and see if there’s something there that can get you closer to your goals.

Until next time, have a great day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting

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Asking the Right Questions

When I owned my own recruiting firm in southern California, I knew I needed to position my firm as a valued industry resource.  What that meant is that somehow I needed to provide services that clients and potential clients would think of first when they needed staffing help.

questions-and-answers1Questions became my ally in that, instead of touting my services, I would ask questions.  What that meant to my clients was that I knew how to listen, which brought me to the head of the pack, so to speak.  Most of my competitors were not doing this on a consistent basis.  And the reason I knew that is that my clients told me.

Some of the questions I always asked included:

  1. When you realize you have a staffing need, who do you think of first?
  2. What other staffing firms are you currently using?
  3. What is it that other staffing firms do for you that you think we can’t do?
  4. How would you rate our services on a 1 – 10 basis, 10 being excellent?
  5. If we’re not a 10, what can we do to make your experience better?
  6. How do you feel about how you’re treated when you call in to our office?

These are just a few of very important questions, designed to elicit a conversation, which can lead to more business. As a business owner, I always felt that the buck stopped with me, meaning that I could have the best staff in the world but if we weren’t asking the right questions, we could be leaving more business on the table.

Remember the 80/20 rule: 80% of your business will come from 20% of your clients. Whether you’re a brand new recruiter or a seasoned one wanting to get back to the basics, maybe I can help. Check out EZRecruiting for more information.

More to come – stay tuned. Have a blessed day!

Darryl

EZRecruiting

 

Smart Moves

There are no shortcuts to achieving financial success as a virtual home based recruiter. There are, however, a lot of things you can do that will put real success well within your reach. Earning a residual income is powerful and a good virtual recruiter can do that by working with companies placing contractors (those who are willing to work on a short-term basis for an hourly rate instead of a salary).

Good candidates are still a challenge to find for the majority of small to medium-sized companies, so why not work with those companies to help them solve their human technology problems? In my career as a recruiter, I always found it much easier to work with smaller companies … always!

Even in today’s economy, when companies are cutting costs, they still need the right employees to keep their doors open and stay profitable.  If you can match the most qualified contractor to the right contract job order, you will make a placement more often than not.

problemsolvingYour job as a virtual recruiter will be to find the right people to present as solutions to problems.  What’s the problem most companies have?  They either need to increase their profits or decrease their expenses to stay in business.  Realizing that this statement is very broad, you can translate it to mean several things.  It could mean they need to re-vamp their sales force, weeding out the non-producers, or it could mean they need to cut some positions that are overpaid and replace them with new talent at a more junior level.

What’s the one key component that a recruiter can offer any company?  Confidentiality. Let’s say they hire you to do a search for a position in which they’re replacing someone.  They don’t want that person to know they’re going to be replaced because that will obviously detract from his/her productivity.  So they hire you to do a confidential search.  That way they don’t have to advertise the position, thus exposing their company name and taking the chance that the person they are replacing will see their ads.

Another scenario is that a company needs a special project completed that will take three to six months.  They want to hire someone for just that length of time but don’t know where to find them.  They also don’t want to bear the burden of laying off someone after the project is over.  Your job will be to find them contractors with the appropriate qualifications who will work for that length of time.

As a virtual contract recruiter, you will find the contractors to fill the orders.  If you don’t have the money to pay the contractors you have out on assignments while you wait for your clients to pay your invoices, I suggest you get connected to a company that can do that kind of payroll funding for you.  Or get hooked up with a company that lets you work from home and they take care of payroll and billing for you.  In the last scenario, the company you work for will take a certain percentage for doing this.  But even that is better than strapping yourself with the burden of payroll and billing.

More to come … stay tuned … have a blessed day!

Darryl

EZRECRUITING.COM

 

20 – 30 Seconds

Resume

It all starts with a resume. Sadly, there are still a lot of people who don’t know how to use theirs as a sales tool. They simply list their current and previous employers, along with a synopsis of their duties in those positions. Big mistake!

A good recruiter knows that hiring authorities take, on average, only 20-30 seconds to review a resume. Yeah, I know … that sucks but it’s the truth. And if they don’t see something right away that hits their hot button, they toss the candidate’s resume into the pile and the job seeker may never hear back from that company. Which leaves them wondering and, most likely, feeling less than confident about their skills.

It’s the recruiter’s job to talk to the job seeker and find out what could set them apart from the pack so that they stand a much better chance of getting hired. It’s also their job to sell something we in the industry call S.A.M. = Saved. Achieved. Made. In other words, what did the candidate Save, Achieve or Make for the companies they worked for? And on the other side they will talk with the hiring authority to find out exactly what they’re looking for in a qualified individual for their opening.

More to come … stay tuned … and have a blessed day,

Darryl

EZRecruiting.com